IPEN IN THE NEWS

At The IPEN (International Positive Education Network) Festival in Dallas, Texas. This is where I was during the last school year, learning all the latest research into positive education and the impact that this style of education and teaching is having on, not just students, but also teachers and staff in schools all over the world. 

There were more than 800 people from over 30 countries expanding the horizon of education. They gathered together at the first ever Festival of Positive Education because emotional well-being is a pre-requisite for all life satisfaction.

Long known as a team rooted in old hokey traditions, the festival offered a change for the Leads to learn a few new tricks that could prove useful in recruiting and retaining players, and making them perform to the best of their ability.

Three major themes in positive psychology and positive education for 2016. Now entering its 16th year as a science, positive psychology is the study of optimal functioning of individuals, groups, and institutions.

The International Positive Education Network, a new nonprofit program, rallies the support of teachers, parents, students and institutions worldwide to shift education policy and practice toward “positive education,”

What is the purpose of a school education? Ruminations on this question by schools, education officials, intergovernmental organizations and governments have materialized into laudable 21st-century goals. 

Applying positive psychology principles to education gave birth to the term positive education and to the Positive Education Summit held in the UK earlier this month. 

This week we sat down with positive psychology and well-being thought leaders live at The Festival of Positive Education in Dallas, TX. We asked them why positive education was so important, what children can gain from it and how focusing on developing character strengths in students can begin to help society as a whole. 

Every parents wants the best for their children, they want their children to be happy and flourish. However, finding the right education can be a challenge. So what is positive education?

Will the Dawn of a ‘Happiness Enlightenment’ Increase Positive Education in Schools? According to IPEN, positive education is focusing on both academics and student character development and well-being in schools. 

More than 600 teachers, school leaders and educators from private schools in Dubai partnered with a line-up of well-being experts to share their insights for creating happier educational communities at the first ‘What Works’ event.

Since happiness is a subject Sir Anthony has made his own, it seems like the safest place to begin to being him back to earth. "Happiness," he explains, "is much better than unhappiness."

A new global organization, the International Positive Education Network (IPEN), has launched, with support from Dallas-based Live Happy LLC. IPEN's campaign calls for a radical shift in how young people are educated. 

Positive education is about merging flourishing—positive emotion, engagement, positive relationships, meaning and accomplishment—with traditional education. 

Over the past year, I've had a number of parents seeking admission for their children and the common comment is: "We've chosen this school because we want our child to have a holistic development, be challenged and be happy". This, I suppose, echoes across many schools in Dubai and around the globe.

This July, we joined more than 800 people from 30+ countries for the inaugural Festival of Positive Education in Dallas, Texas. It was an incredibly inspiring and uplifting event to be part of.

Should happiness be part of the school curriculum? Meditation is just one strand of new "positive education" methods starting to build momentum and gravitas in schools.

The belief that one needs to work hard, score high exam grades and then secure a good job to be happy is being challenged by the emirate’s private school regulator.

 

The International Positive Education Network is a newly formed research organization designed to encourage scholarly research and engage in practical implementation of positive psychology ideas in the classroom. 

The new International Positive Education Network is encouraging a shift in education priorities. But what does this mean in practice? James O'Shaughnessy and Emily Larson explain.

This week we sat down with positive psychology and well-being thought leaders live at The Festival of Positive Education in Dallas, TX. We asked them why positive education was so important, what children can gain from it and how focusing on developing character strengths in students can begin to help society as a whole. 

What is IPEN, you ask? IPEN is the International Positive Education Network. Unlike most academic endeavors, which value academic achievement over all else, positive education is a double helix, two strands of equal importance, intertwined.  

Positive education (PE) is the integrative field of study that tightly links human well-being with academic achievement. Common sense tells us that healthy, happy students will, on average, be more successful academically.

A schoolmaster takes positive education from the classroom out into the world. Sir Anthony Seldon is often described as Britain’s best-known schoolmaster. He’s a pioneer in education, biographer to three prime ministers and an author.

As any parent knows, nothing is more important or more challenging than helping children grow into good, kind and responsible young people. Yet this essential task of character development is full of parado

Is resilience the secret to academic success? A 2011 University of Pennsylvania study followed 300 students through a year of middle school, measuring their good and bad feelings and how teachers rated their classroom behavior.